Law & Politics

Minister Frets On Re-Election

By Valerie / June 13, 2024 /

Liberals seeking a fourth term face tight contests nationwide “including in my riding,” Public Works Minister Jean-Yves Duclos said yesterday. Duclos made his remarks while speaking to reporters about a June 24 byelection in one of the safest Liberal seats in the country, Toronto-St. Paul’s.

“We need to keep showing Canadians we are living in the best country in the world and we need to make it even better and that involves people working even harder, in particular people in my Party,” said Duclos. “We know how challenging the situation is in Canada.”

“Do you think it’s going to be a tight race?” asked a reporter. “It will be tight everywhere including in my riding in the next election,” replied Duclos.

Read More

EU’s new AI rules ignite battle over data transparency

By Roli / June 13, 2024 /

A new set of laws governing the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the European Union will force companies to be more transparent about the data used to train their systems, prying open one of the industry’s most closely guarded secrets.

In the 18 months since Microsoft-backed (MSFT.O), opens new tab OpenAI unveiled ChatGPT to the public, there has been a surge of public engagement and investment in generative AI, a set of applications that can be used to rapidly produce text, images, and audio content.

One of the more contentious sections of the Act states that organisations deploying general-purpose AI models, such as ChatGPT, will have to provide “detailed summaries” of the content used to train them. The newly established AI Office said it plans to release a template for organizations to follow in early 2025, following a consultation with stakeholders.

While the details have yet to be hammered out, AI companies are highly resistant to revealing what their models have been trained on, describing the information as a trade secret that would give competitors an unfair advantage were it made public.

Read More

How a New Jersey man was wrongly arrested through facial recognition tech now in use in Ontario

By Roli / June 13, 2024 /

Peel, York police recently announced they were implementing Idemia’s facial recognition system.

A New Jersey man who was wrongly jailed after being misidentified through facial recognition software has a message for two Ontario police agencies now using the same technology.

“There’s clear evidence that it doesn’t work,” Nijeer Parks said.

Parks, now 36, spent 10 days behind bars for a January 2019 theft and assault on a police officer that he didn’t commit. He said he was released after he provided evidence he was in another city, making a money transfer at the time of the offence. Prosecutors dropped the case the following November, according to an internal police report.

“He doesn’t look anything like me,” Parks, who is Black, said of the man in the picture that police used to identify him. “I’m like … you’re basically telling me we all look alike.”

Read More

Employers Fear More Strikes

By Valerie / June 13, 2024 /

Employers’ groups yesterday said a federal ban on use of replacement workers may lead to more strikes and lockouts in rail, marine shipping and other sectors. Parliament is preparing to pass a replacement worker ban under Bill C-58 An Act To Amend The Canada Labour Code.

“This debate needs to be focused on documented facts,” Derrick Hynes, CEO of Federally Regulated Employers Transportation and Communication, testified at the Senate social affairs committee. “Analysis to date suggests two things: Replacement worker bans result in more strikes and longer strikes.”

“These bans incentivize strike activity and discourage collective bargaining,” said Hynes. “Those most affected by replacement worker bans are everyday Canadians. When major employers like airlines, ports, railways and telecom are shut down, supply chains break.”

Bill C-58 would restrict federally regulated employers from using replacem

Read More

Top 5 countries Canadians hate With political tensions rising and an economy in decline, Canadians have formed strong opinions of several countries, many of them negative.

By Valerie / June 13, 2024 /

Often portrayed as America’s happy-go-lucky neighbours to the north, with political tensions rising and an economy in decline, Canadians have formed strong opinions of several countries, many of them negative.

Read More

Memos show an FBI security inquiry tried to unmask employee support for former President Trump

By Roli / June 13, 2024 /

FBI officials conducting a top-secret security clearance review for a longtime employee asked witnesses whether that employee was known to support former President Donald Trump, if he had expressed concerns about the Covid-19 vaccine or had attended a Second Amendment rally, according to internal memos that prompted a complaint to the Justice Department’s internal watchdog alleging political bias inside the bureau.

The employee’s security clearance was revoked months after the interviews, which confirmed his support for Trump and gun rights and his concerns about the Covid vaccine, according to the documents obtained by Just the News.

The memos show that agents for the FBI’s Security Division asked at least three witnesses in spring 2022 whether the employee, whose name and job title was redacted from the memos, had been known to “vocalize support for President Trump” or “vocalize objections to Covid-19 vaccination.” Agents ascertained from at least one witness that the worker, in fact, had declined to get the coronavirus inoculation.

Read More

“$8B And You Don’t Know?”

By Valerie / June 12, 2024 /

Environmental benefits of an $8 billion subsidy program for industry are unknown, Department of Environment managers yesterday told the Commons public accounts committee. Conservative MP Dan Mazier (Swan River-Dauphin, Man.) expressed outrage.

“You have no idea?” asked MP Mazier. “What is most frustrating, you are so flippant about it. You don’t even care.”

Cabinet in 2021 launched the Net Zero Accelerator to subsidize factory refits. Environment Commissioner Jerry DeMarco in an April 30 report Net Ze

Read More

This Will Be Law September 1

By Valerie / June 12, 2024 /

Blacklock’s shareholders issued the following statement: The Attorney General and a federal judge are enacting new rules allowing password sharing. This impacts all internet users nationwide. It follows a Federal Court decision in Blacklock’s Reporter v. Attorney General, case number 2024 FC 829.

This is the law by September 1 without an appeal. The ruling runs to 67 pages but the key paragraph is number 136. What does it mean? Here are the answers:

Can I share my passwords? Yes, so long as you can think up some “legitimate business reason.” You don’t have to literally be in business. This is up to you. One legitimate business reason could be saving money on passwords.

What type of password can I share? Any kind at all. The rule applies to any ordinary password to websites, newspapers, video and music services, library databases, scientific or technical journals, peer-reviewed periodicals, you nam

Read More

Vows ‘No Lobby’ Tax Reform

By Valerie / June 12, 2024 /

Any future Conservative cabinet would appoint a lobby-free tax reform committee, Opposition Leader Pierre Poilievre said yesterday. He made the pledge as Conservatives opposed an $18 billion increase in capital gains taxes.

“Within 60 days of becoming prime minister, my government will name a tax reform task force of entrepreneurs, inventors, farmers and workers but no lobbyists to devise a bring-it-home tax cut that will, one, bring home production and paycheques with lower taxes on work, hiring and making stuff, and two, bring home fairness by reducing the share of the tax burden paid by the poor and the working class while cutting back on tax-funded corporate welfare and cracking down on overseas tax havens,” Poilievre told the Commons.

The tax force would also be mandated

Read More

Bill To Fix ‘This Crazy World’

By Valerie / June 12, 2024 /

A federal ban on replacement workers in case of strikes or lockouts will bring “certainty in this crazy world,” Labour Minister Seamus O’Regan said yesterday. The bill reflects the power and influence of Canadian labour, he said.

“Wherever I can reduce anxiety and increase stability and certainty in this crazy world I will,” O’Regan testified at the Senate social affairs committee. “That is the whole design.”

Bill C-58 An Act To Amend The Canada Labour Code would restrict federally regulated employers including banks, marine shippers, railways and telecom companies from using replacement workers in strikes or lockouts under threat of $100,000-per day fines. The bill passed the Commons May 27 by unanimous vote.

Read More